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Bill Cardoso On Tour: California, Canada, Maryland

by Ashley Walsh in Creative Electron, Events Comments: 0

This summer’s stops along the Dr. Bill Cardoso international tour include the San Francisco Bay Area, Ontario, Canada, and College Park Maryland. To register for an event contact Content Manager, Ashley Walsh at info@creativeelectron.com.


iPhone X Teardown

May 23,2018

SMTA Silicon Valley Continuing Education

Hosted by Nextflex

San Jose, CA

It’s been 10 years since Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone to the world. Much has happened since then. Over this past decade, the iPhone became a reference design, and the object of desire of a legion of fans who wait anxiously for every launch of the Cupertino company. Undoubtedly, the most advanced iPhone in the market today, the iPhone X is a technology marvel. The double stacked boards, dual battery, and a face recognition sensor bring the iPhone X to a whole different level.

In this presentation, we’ll explore these technological advances by a live teardown of the iPhone X. The teardown will be followed by a detailed coverage of the technical details of critical parts of the device. This live teardown will be accompanied by x-ray and CT images of the iPhone X, so the audience will get unprecedented insights on what makes this iPhone tick. More importantly, we will explore the assembly process utilized to put the iPhone X together. This presentation is targeted at a wide technical audience looking for a better understanding on how advance consumer electronics are designed and assembled.

Lights Out in the Inventory Room: The Evolution to Fully Automated Material Management

May 24,2018

eSmart Factory

Hosted by SMTA and Global SMT & Packing

Amazon currently employs over 45,000 robots across 20 fulfillment centers around the world. That’s a 50% increase in a single year. As the lights out concept rapidly grows with the giant retailer, automation adoption still finds resistance in the SMT manufacturing world. Despite the great progress in the development of the integrated production line with Industry 4.0, a critical part of the manufacturing chain still offline. Inventory rooms around the world must still operate with a far reduced level of sophistication. It is not uncommon to find thousands of reels densely packed in hundreds of linear feet of shelving space.

The simple exercise of counting back reels as they come back from the production floor is not standard practice. And even when they are counted, the count is often made by hand. The lack of focus on the automation of our inventory rooms leads to an increasing loss of productivity due to line stoppages. When associated with the recent increase in lead times for electronic components, line stoppage has become a crippling problem that makes inventory accuracy a necessity. In this presentation, we will discuss the state of the art in material management automation and the barriers of entry to a fully automated inventory room.

We will also explore the infrastructure needed to be in place to realize an accurate, fast, and efficient methodology for a fully automated inventory control. This investment is critical to realize the benefits in efficiency unleashed by Industry 4.0.

Smartphone High Density Packaging Analysis: iPhone X

June 07, 2018

International Conference for Electronics Enabling Technology

Hosted by SMTA

It’s been 10 years since Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone to the world. Much has happened since then. Over this past decade, the iPhone became a reference design, and the object of desire of a legion of fans who wait anxiously for every launch of the Cupertino company. Undoubtedly, the most advanced iPhone in the market today, the iPhone X is a technology marvel. The double stacked boards, dual battery, and a face recognition sensor bring the iPhone X to a whole different level.

In this presentation, we’ll explore these technological advances by a live teardown of the iPhone X. The teardown will be followed by a detailed coverage of the technical details of critical parts of the device. This live teardown will be accompanied by x-ray and CT images of the iPhone X, so the audience will get unprecedented insights on what makes this iPhone tick. More importantly, we will explore the assembly process utilized to put the iPhone X together. This presentation is targeted at a wide technical audience looking for a better understanding on how advance consumer electronics are designed and assembled.

iPhone X: Steve Jobs’ iPhone

June 14, 2018

Upper Midwest Expo and Tech Forum

DoubleTree Minneapolis

Hosted by SMTA

It’s been 10 years since Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone to the world. Much has happened since then. Over this past decade, the iPhone became a reference design, and the object of desire of a legion of fans who wait anxiously for every launch of the Cupertino company. Undoubtedly, the most advanced iPhone in the market today, the iPhone X is a technology marvel. The double stacked boards, dual battery, and a face recognition sensor bring the iPhone X to a whole different level.

In this presentation, we’ll explore these technological advances by a live teardown of the iPhone X. The teardown will be followed by a detailed coverage of the technical details of critical parts of the device. This live teardown will be accompanied by x-ray and CT images of the iPhone X, so the audience will get unprecedented insights on what makes this iPhone tick. More importantly, we will explore the assembly process utilized to put the iPhone X together. This presentation is targeted at a wide technical audience looking for a better understanding on how advance consumer electronics are designed and assembled.

A New Method to Authenticate Components and PCB Assemblies Using Fingerprint from X-Ray Images

June 26, 2018

Symposium on Counterfeit Parts and Materials

College Park Marriott Hotel & Conference Center

Hosted by SMTA

Taggants have been widely adopted in the fight against counterfeit components. The process of applying taggants to components consists of first determining the authenticity of the part. This step can be achieved by either knowing that the component is authentic (by a well-documented chain of custody from the original component manufacturer), or by running a batch of tests to sufficiently determine the conformity of the component to its original specifications.

Taggants are often chemical compounds with a unique mix of elements that are embedded into the surface of the component. This unique mix effectively introduces a fingerprint to the component, and the combination of component identification and fingerprint is carefully uploaded to a database. Later in the supply chain, the taggant can be read back by special sensors to verify that the component and the attached fingerprint match as in the database. Some of the shortcomings of this method include the need to prepare this unique compound, the need to correctly apply it to the surface of the component, and the need to use expensive sensors to read back the fingerprint of the component at the point of use. There is also the risk that the taggant might end up in the wrong hands, which would allow such individuals to criminally authenticate counterfeit components.

The other major shortcoming of taggants relate to the authenticity protection of printed circuit board assemblies (PCBA). PCBAs can be considered electronic systems, each with hundreds or thousands of electronic components. Thus, the application of a unique taggant to each component is not feasible.

In this work, we introduce the use of the x-ray image as the unique fingerprint for an electronic component or PCBA. Unique features of the x-ray image such as solder voids, cracks, part alignment, die attach porosity and voiding, die placement and alignment, and wire bonding diagram. These are just a few of the many features in the x-ray image that can be used in tandem to create a unique fingerprint for a single component or an entire PCBA. This technique can also be expanded to mechanical objects by utilizing other idiosyncratic features of the part – such as voids and porosity – to generate the x-ray image fingerprint.

The x-ray image fingerprint is calculated using unique algorithms and inserted into a custom database. Unlike taggants, the x-ray image technique does not allow for any adulteration because we are not adding any material to the component. Instead, the x-ray image fingerprint technique uses features of the material itself to generate the fingerprint.

Later in the supply chain, to read back these features to verify the authenticity of the component or PCBA, the user needs to image the part back with a compatible x-ray machine. The identification of the part will determine which locations and features are to be used to retrieve the fingerprint from the database. The same algorithms are then used to determine if any changes have occurred to the part, and if the part is the same as introduced in the database.

It is important to note that much like taggants, normal usage of the component or PCBAs, even under thermal cycling, humidity and altitude variations, will not change the features utilized to create the x-ray image fingerprint of the parts. However, reworking these parts will cause a fingerprint mismatch. This is an added advantage of the x-ray image technique over taggants, because unlike taggants x-ray image fingerprint can identify illicit reworked parts.