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TruView Dual Energy: a New Way to See X-Ray Inspection

Mar
04

TruView Dual Energy: a New Way to See X-Ray Inspection

Since the first x-ray images were created, operators of radiography systems have been challenged by a fundamental shortcoming of x-ray inspection: material density variation. While inspecting a sample of any sort, it is usual to find materials of different densities sitting side-by-side. Examples of this situation include dense electronic components (transformers, power amplifiers, etc.) mounted on boards, BGA balls, heat sinks, bones, and metal casings.

The challenge is that operators have to turn down the power of their x-ray system to image the low density materials. However, the low energy x-rays do not penetrate the high density materials, which will not create an image (under-expose). As a result, the power of the x-ray source must be increased to expose the dense parts of the sample at the expense of over-exposing the low density parts.

With the Dual Energy toolbox in your TruView X-Ray system this is finally no longer a problem! The patent-pending algorithm allows you to first take the low energy image of your sample. The next step is to take a high energy image to expose the high density parts of the sample. The Dual Energy toolbox automatically blends both images – low and high energies – to produce incredible images that show you what you’ve never seen before: high and low density materials beautifully exposed side by side!

The first example is a wire crimped connector. The connector has a low density plastic casing that houses the high density metal crimps and wires. As seen in Figure 1, the attempt to image the high density material completely washes away the low density plastic housing. Au contraire, the image in Figure 2 shows that the low energy image perfectly displays the plastic housing of the connector while completely masking the wires and crimps.

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Figure 1 – High energy x-ray image of wire connector showing crimped wire and high density material

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Figure 2 – Low energy x-ray image of wire connector showing plastic case and low density material

The patent-pending Dual Energy toolbox in TruView 5 Software was used to image both low and high energy parts of the connector and show them simultaneously, as seen in Figure 3.

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Figure 3 – Dual energy of the crimped wire connector using TruView patent-pending Dual Energy toolbox

The second example we will analyse is the classical ball grid array (BGA). The solder balls in the BGA are very dense, thus a high energy setting of the x-ray source is needed to produce a good image as seen in Figure 4. However, the low density parts around the BGA are over exposed, and therefore cannot be seen. Figure 5 reveals all low energy details of the low density parts of the PCB to expose traces and other features and devices in the board.

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Figure 4 – High energy image of a ball grid array (BGA) component showing the high density details. The voids in each ball are clearly visible.

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Figure 5 – Low energy image of a ball grid array (BGA) component showing the low density details. The details around each ball are clearly visible.

Once again the Dual Energy toolbox in the TruView 5 Software was used to merge both images in Figure 6. This figure shows how the Dual Energy image can show both high and low density materials with high resolution.

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Figure 6 – Dual Energy image of a ball grid array (BGA) component showing the high and low density details. The voids in each ball – and the pads, components, traces, and vias – are also are clearly visible.

The last example we’d like to share with you is of a transformer mounted onto a PCB. As seen in Figure 7, the high energy image shows all the details in the of the transformer. The individual wires are visible in this image. The low energy image in Figure 8 shows all the details of the PCB.

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Figure 7 – High energy image of transformer. Individual wires are visible around the magnetic core.

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Figure 8 – Low energy image of transformer. All traces on the PCB are clearly visible.

The video in Figure 9 shows the Dual Energy process in action. Please feel free to leave a comment and to contact us for more information.

Figure 9 – Dual Energy toolbox for x-ray inspection in action

About the Author:

Dr. Bill Cardoso is the President of Creative Electron. He holds a MS and PhD degrees from the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) and an MBA from The University of Chicago. An industry thought leader, Bill has been recognized as IIT's 2011 Outstanding Young Alumnus Awardee for his contributions to science and technology. He is also a Senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Surface Mount Technology Association (SMTA), American Physics Society (APS), and the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE). Bill is a holder of several patents in the areas of radiation detection, radiography, and quality inspection.

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