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“Everyone’s Got a Beard,” and Other Observations with Phil Stoten

Phillip Stoten

Solid content in this week’s Fireside Chat with the Xperts with content specialist Phil Stoten.  That’s right, Phil Stoten of SCOOP joins David Kruidhof and Dr. Bill Cardoso for a heady, wide-ranging conversation that does not disappoint.

In a role reversal, Phil agreed to play guest rather than host, and he nailed it.  He and our hosts share thoughts on the future of globalization and supply chain security, as well as the successes and failures of digital marketing during the pandemic.  But it’s more than just that, as they ponder whether beards are here to stay, revel in the joy of working in pajamas and explore the pursuit of happiness.

Oh, and puppet shows!  You don’t want to miss this one.  Enjoy the video, and then reach out to us directly with any question.  Register for upcoming Fireside Chats with the Xperts and view our archives here.

 

Transcript:

David Kruidhof:
Okay. Well, welcome back to another FIRESIDE CHAT WITH THE XPERTS. This week, we have our good friend, Phil Stoten with us. He is the founder of SCOOP. He’s an experienced technologist, journalist, and a very good moderator. So, I know Bill’s been on this show several times. I’ve had many interactions with him over the years. He also has a column called What’s the SCOOP on EMS now. So definitely check that out. Welcome, Phil.

Philip Stoten:
Hey, good to see you. Thanks for having me on. And yeah, it’s fun to have the boot on the other foot to have Bill asking the question, so I should resist the temptation to interview anybody today.

David Kruidhof:
Yeah, I believe you’re allowed zero questions today.

Philip Stoten:
There you go. Okay. Well, I’m relaxed. I’m sitting on the beach taking the sunshine in, so it’s all good.

David Kruidhof:
Perfect. Cool. So, why don’t you tell us a little bit about SCOOP and founding the [inaudible 00:01:13].

Philip Stoten:
Yeah, I mean, I guess for anybody that doesn’t know me or doesn’t know SCOOP, SCOOP kind of came out of my work. I was doing with various different publications editing and publishing content. A realization, I guess, that people were struggling to produce that content and to have a really good content strategy and started helping out advertisers and kind of selling content alongside advertising for the various different publications I’d worked with and I had set up over the years. And then it kind of span off into a separate business initially as a turn key and a marketing company with full services. But then focusing on that one thing of content, we use the slogan, All About Content, and I guess that’s because I feel that’s what we’re really good at and what we’re uniquely positioned to do. So, you mentioned the technologist. I always consider myself a generalist, not a specialist, so I can talk about all kinds of different topics.

Philip Stoten:
And what we do is we help our clients tell their story against a backdrop of what’s going on in the market and we help get them published in the publications they want to be in. So, I write for Forbes, I write for Entrepreneur, I write for EMSNow, and it’s great to hear the three of those in the same sentence, but we have other writers on the team and we write for a whole bunch of publications. I think in the last month we’ve been in Robotics 24/7, we’ve been in several Supply Chain magazines. We’ve had pieces that we’ve ghost written in The Wall Street Journal kind of anywhere and everywhere.

Philip Stoten:
And obviously the other element is the video content we used to do that at trade shows. We now do that on the beach, which is great. I’m good with that. And yeah, it’s great to see more of this stuff actually and I’ve enjoyed watching the show when I was asked to come on, I went and watched a few episodes and I enjoyed watching Phil Zarrow, which is always an entertaining guy to watch. And Mike Conrad and these folks that are saying, and I’d just this morning, I watched the solar one, which actually I thought it was really good, the whole energy debate. So yeah, some neat stuff.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
I was just wondering how much it costs you to set up your booth on the beach. Must be a fortune.

Philip Stoten:
There you go. Yeah. It’s actually a piece of green fabric. I didn’t even shout for a whole green screen. I went to the local fabric store and picked a color. I’ve got another piece of green fabric that’s the wrong color that doesn’t want it because it’s clearly too close to the color of my eyes. And I look like this demonic person with whatever I’ve got behind me in my eyes as well. So, we fixed that, but yeah, it works pretty good actually. And yeah, I spend a bit of time in the studio.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
Now, how did Forbes happen? I mean, that’s a huge deal, right?

Philip Stoten:
Yeah.

Philip Stoten:
Yeah. Well, I guess with Forbes, they have criteria for writers and I’ve often pitched other writers to them. And in fact, we just hired a new senior partner at SCOOP, a guy called Mark Annunziata, who is a senior contributor for Forbes. He was formerly the chief economist of GE and he worked for the World Economic Forum before that. And he’s done a Ted talk, which is always something I’d like to do. I don’t like Ted talks online. They don’t seem to work as well, but the original format with the round carpet, maybe I’ll just have to buy the carpet and do my own Ted talks.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
Yeah, got to go for it.

Philip Stoten:
Yeah. But yeah, there’s an application process and the vetting process and they look at the content that you’ve published and they look at the work that you’ve done over quite a long period. And it’s kind of like, you just get an email saying yes or no, and it’s as simple as that. There’s no appeal, there’s no anything. So, and it’s been a fun one to write for as has Entrepreneur Magazine. I really liked that one and, Bill, I like writing about technology, but I like writing about the kind of bigger trends that exist around that.

Philip Stoten:
What’s going on, what’s moving and shaking the industry? And the moment we’re in this time of huge change. So, having access to the Forbes audience, the Entrepreneur audiences, as well as all the Trade Press audience is fantastic for someone that likes to shoot from the hip and is opinionated like I am. So, I’m pretty strict when I’m writing for other people, but when I’m writing for myself, I can just, like I say, just shoot from the hip and tell it the way I see it. Yeah, there are some challenges ahead in the industry and it’s interesting to see how we meet those challenges and face up to them.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
See, that’s Australia revenue, an English man, right? That’s what it is?

Philip Stoten:
Yeah. I’ve been in Australia for over a year, which is the longest I’ve been in one country for over 30 years.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
That’s incredible.

Philip Stoten:
So, it’s just been crazy. But yeah, I have been very lucky. I can’t think of a better place to have been trapped through the whole pandemic than here. And like I was saying to you off camera we just shut in the border with, well, just closed the connection to Brisbane in Queensland, because they’ve got seven cases and in Victoria where 30+ days straight without a single COVID case. So, whilst the world is rushing to get people vaccinated, we’ve been able to be a little bit more thoughtful and a bit slower with that process and with the approval of vaccines and the rollout of vaccines, we’ve been able to be a bit more strategic, but we did a really strict shutdown last year for 15 weeks. We stayed home. And that seemed to help a lot. We’re an Island, we’re isolated, so that’s a big benefit, but yeah. It’s been a good place to be this last 12 months.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
And this is what’s interesting, right? Because this experience for the past year and we just had our first anniversary of the lockdown. Lockdown happened in March 2019. It showed that we were not an Island, right?

Philip Stoten:
Yeah.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
And then you were a guy that I met at every trade show out there, right? You were traveling, I don’t know how many months a year you were traveling, but you were always traveling, in Europe, in Asia, in America. And it’s be fascinating to see your perspective on how work has changed due to COVID. Right? Because I was going to talk to you because you have these bigger pictures, the biggest perspective based on everyone you talk to you. And so, what’s the future for us?

Philip Stoten:
Well, the future for us? I actually write a piece at the weekend for Forbes and I kind of focused on two areas. What’s changing in manufacturing and what’s changing in the marketing of manufacturing and they’re obviously very closely connected. But this whole idea, I think this whole idea of globalization has been seriously challenged by this whole process. One, because we can’t travel, two, because supply chain has been impacted by everything. We say the pandemic was the biggest disruption, but before that we had the trade wars and tariffs and all that kind of stuff going on. Now we have a big semiconductor shortage. We just had a ship backed up in the Suez canal as it’s going to impact pact the supply chain for a whole bunch of stuff actually. It’s real.

Philip Stoten:
So, it’s just like disruption, and there are going to be more of those. So, there’s a challenge to the manufacturing industry, and if we see a reversal in globalization and a trend towards more domestic supply chains, more supply chain security, then I think that has a big impact on the way we run our businesses and the way we think about the products we buy and the way we make those products. And then on the marketing side, we just switched emphasis completely to these digital strategies, to these online strategies. We’ve been trying, I think for 10 years, we were messing about with the idea of the virtual trade show. And I thought two years ago we realized it was crap and it didn’t work. And then suddenly we had to do that.

Philip Stoten:
So, suddenly they’re everywhere. And for me, the big tests last year were what would happen to the huge shows like the Hannover fair and electronic. And then when we come into this year, what would happen to the big shows that I always went to at the start of the year as like starting with CES and then South by Southwest, and to my mind, they’ve worked in delivering content, thought leadership content. And as I said before, we’re all about content and that’s what we’re focused on, but what they haven’t worked is in that kind of trade show way. There wasn’t a great way of even with CES, which I felt these guys have got deep pockets, they’ve got huge sponsors. They’re going to be able to make this thing work. And I went on and I watched the keynotes and stuff and it wasn’t that much different to this.

Philip Stoten:
It was guys in studios and guys in studios with bigger budgets, but still just guys in studios and their live audience. But it was a good way to see content. You could watch it on demand. You didn’t have to rush around from one press event to another press event during CES. But you didn’t get any of that show floor vibe that you got. So for me, CES was always three days of press conferences at the beginning. And then I would just pick a topic and say, okay, it’s down and I’ll look up robotics. And I would just walk the show in the robotics area and just meet people and chat to them and find stuff out. And then write a piece based on that. And there isn’t a good way of doing that. So, you’ve got to kind of change the way you network and change the way you communicate.

Philip Stoten:
So, yeah, I think we’ve seen a huge change and I think that change is continuing. And I don’t see us going back to all of those same old habits. I don’t see trade shows coming back in the same way. And I’ve talked to people that have said about trade shows, “We’re glad we didn’t have to go to that one this year.” Some of the responses. “Now nobody’s going into that one. We don’t feel bad about not going.” And you and I have discussed this before, Bill. When people first started canceling trade shows, one of the first things we did within SCOOP was say to customers and prospects, “Hey, come to us with your trade show deliverables and let’s figure out how we can generate that number of leads, make sure you have that number of thought leadership opportunities, make sure you have that amount of media liaison, make sure you have that amount of communication with your customers about your products without a trade show.”

Philip Stoten:
And with probably a lower budget. And I always say I always start with, what leads did you generate from that show last year? And when they start with, “Well, not many,” or they didn’t really turn into anything you know that the model was perhaps fundamentally flawed. And so much of the show budget, doesn’t go to the organization putting on the show. It goes to carpet, drayage, local hotels. And that industry needs to exist in some way. But is it delivering value in terms of your marketing dollars? I don’t know. So yeah, I think there’s a lot of rethinking been going on over the last 12 months. And I think as we come out, the results of that are going to be really interesting.

David Kruidhof:
Yeah. So, I want to pick on that, the article that you wrote about marketing and manufacturing, right? And we’ve had these conversations in the past, and you are a more optimistic person than I am. You come from a perspective that people actually learn from mistakes and from events, I’m of course, skeptical on the ability to actually learn and change their behaviors. And if you think about black swan events, right? You can say, “Well, COVID was a black swan, the ship under the Suez canal, that’s a black swan.

Philip Stoten:
There’s a lot of black swans out there.

David Kruidhof:
Well, at which point do you figure our it’s not a black swan anymore. Supply chain disruptions are reality. And what I see is like this, we’re going to have a split, right? You have companies that are going to be prepared for the next interruptions, or they’re going to do what you said, which is to re-strategize, re-energize local supply chains. It’ll be less susceptible to these events and companies who won’t. Because you know what? What are the chances this is going to happen again. Let’s keep rolling. How do you see the divide actually playing out in our industry?

Philip Stoten:
Yeah, in some ways I think it is a bit generational and there is this old school thing of we’ve always done it that way. It works that way. Once we can get back to doing what we do, then everything will be okay again. So, there’s a tendency to think of that. And then there’s a younger generation that are being a bit more revolutionary rather than evolutionary. And they’re saying, “Okay, we have to have stuff that’s digitally enabled. We have to look at the supply chain. We have to look at the systems in place to manage that. And then the millennials that are buying stuff online that want tracking that want to be able to see where stuff’s being made, where stuff comes from, they’re the people that are more environmentally conscious. So, want to be concerned about where the raw materials are coming from and how those raw materials are being produced.

Philip Stoten:
So, I think I see some change there. I see some government momentum, which is interesting. And I see President Biden waiting in on the semiconductor issue and saying, “Hey, we need to build semiconductor factories.” And we all know we can put a semiconductor factory up in a couple of weeks. That’s really straightforward process. And, and yeah, cheapest chips would be the wrong term, but it’s fascinating to see the government’s getting involved in that. But I think supply chain security is hugely important. And actually interestingly, we started working with some people in the rare earths side of the market and to titanium powders and lithium and the high-tech industry is dependent on some absolutely critical raw materials. And whilst the US and a lot of Europe has been snoozing over the last 10 or 15 years, Asia has been developing its supply chain in those areas as well.

Philip Stoten:
So for example, with titanium, huge dependence on Asia and Russia and Argentina. If you were picking three countries to be most dependent on in terms of your supply chain, they’re obviously in your top half a dozen. Yeah. So, there are some challenges there, but I think there are people that are keen to revolutionize the industry and see the benefit in terms of the big picture. And I’m optimistic about them, but like you say, Bill, I’m prominently optimistic and yeah, I think it’s a nice way to be. I like to believe the good in people and in society generally. And I think technology can help us with a whole bunch of things. And I think that’s what we need in supply chain.

Philip Stoten:
We need that. We need supply chains to be digitally enabled. We need them to be agile and adaptable and we need them to be kind of ready for the future of these industries, because if we’re going to move to EVs, which I hope we are, because it’s good for the planet then we need enough lithium to do that for the batteries. We need a huge battery storage capacity so we can move to renewable energies. There’s a whole lot of things we need to change. So, we need revolutionary people in the industry to make that happen.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
Yeah. I’m fascinated by this redesign of the globalization concept, right? And Marshall plan for post World War II and how the world was conceived as this big global tribe where what’s yours is mine and what’s mine is mine, right? And now once we move this digital platform, when we start talking about digital twins and we start placing things, both our manufacturing plants online so we can basically ship products and redesigns all over the globe. How are governments going to catch up? How do tariffs going to catch up. Once we live in this digital world where cryptocurrency and the distributed manufacturing plants is easily going to optimize manufacturing in Indonesia or Mexico or Atlanta, right? In a fraction of a second. How are regulators going to catch up? They can barely understand Twitter, right?

Philip Stoten:
Yeah.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
How are we going to get that far?

Philip Stoten:
Well, yeah. I mean, I do think it’s fascinating and I’m always curious when I look at government policy and obviously we’ve been watching what’s going on in the US because you’ve had an election. So, and it’s been an absolutely fascinating one. And it’s always interesting to try and figure out whether what the government is doing and saying reflects what’s happening in terms of, at the grassroots level, in terms of what the people think and what the people really want. And there’s balance there, isn’t there? Because government is protective of those old industries that we know are perhaps fundamentally not good industries for the long term. You look at the coal industry, you look at the way energy has been produced from fossil fuels. You look at the automotive industry, which employs massive amount of people with really good jobs.

Philip Stoten:
But it’s basically working around the internal combustion engine, and it’s got a long way to go to convert to something better. So, you look at government policy and you look at the way people think, and you say, okay, are they parallel? And then you look at this globalization, maybe this globalization experiment that we’ve been going through and this chasing of low cost labor around the world, which I think doesn’t make sense. And then you start to explore the digital transformation and can we use digital transformation to create a manufacturing Renaissance in the US or a manufacturing Renaissance in Europe? And I’m pretty sure we’re seeing something, but then you start, part of that is layering in automation and autonomy and when you do that, there’s displacing jobs. So, the government has to get involved there and you have to have a good social policy to be able to figure out how to do that.

Philip Stoten:
So, it’s a very complex debate, but I think fundamentally what we have to avoid is when we look at low cost labor, it’s normally there, low cost labor normally exists temporarily. And it’s normally in some way exploitative. Not necessarily just exploitive in terms of the low cost labor or the people work in themselves because actually China over the last 30 years has taken 500 million people out of poverty, which is fantastic. And that’s one of the positives of all those jobs going to China in manufacturing and in these other industries. So, I think that’s really important, but it’s not just exploitative in terms of the people it’s often exploitative in terms of the environment. And that there aren’t the same level of priorities in terms of what we’re doing in terms of carbon emissions or what we’re doing in terms of taking care of diversity and all those other issues.

Philip Stoten:
So, there are big challenges in globalization. What we need to have, if we think about it in terms of manufacturing is manufacturing that can operate successfully in pretty much any geography and that makes sense, doesn’t it? Because everything else surely has to be temporary and not sustainable. So, when we use the word sustainability, we want that to mean sustainability in terms of the planet and the workforce, but we also want it to be sustainable in terms of it will continue to happen, it will continue to make profit. And it’s not just let’s get this stuff made cheaply in Malaysia. And when Malaysia’s labor rates go up too high, let’s move to the Vietnam or let’s move somewhere else because that isn’t sustainable. That’s temporary in the same way that using fossil fuels is temporary and not sustainable. So, I think we need to think about that.

Philip Stoten:
And I think automation and digital transformation and all those things gives us a whole bunch of opportunities, but we need to have government policy that supports that and is thoughtful of that and is not just protectionist. How do we protect ourselves from the rest of the world? But it’s clear that we’re not a single global tribe. We’re a bunch of tribes that have to live and function well amongst each other and have different skillsets and should be able to share and utilize those skills in a better way. You said I was at an optimist earlier. I think I’m actually a little bit utopian as well. I’ve always had that kind of free movement.

Philip Stoten:
I’ve been lucky. I was born in the UK. So, I have a British passport and that’s pretty much allowed me to travel and work anywhere in the world. And if your skills are in demand, the free movement of labor pretty much exists for you. I love the idea that that would exist for everybody, but it kind of doesn’t, does it? So, it’s challenging. But yeah, I think government’s got to reflect what we want as people. And I think people fundamentally want something that is sustainable and is healthy.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
Speaking of what people want and I hope you didn’t take offense when I call it the optimist. It was supposed to be a compliment.

Philip Stoten:
Yeah, no. I take it exactly as that. I am optimist and I am utopian and I don’t mind that.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
If you had a chance to talk to yourself, your 22 year old Phil Stoten, what would you tell young Philip,

Philip Stoten:
What would I tell young Philip? Invest in Zoom.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
Where’d you put your time in young Philip? Your energy and your time.

Philip Stoten:
Yeah. Buy some Zoom stock, get digitally enabled. I don’t know. It’s interesting and because I’m an optimist I tend to look very much forward. So, I never look back and have regrets. If I look back to 22 year old, Phillip, I’d say spend, “Spend more time with your dad because he’s not around anymore.” Those kinds of things, family that hugely important. I loved every single part of my kids growing up. So, getting to do that again would be freaking awesome. So, that stuff’s great. In terms of work and career, just do something you love. I mean, there’s lots of parts of my job that I find that I think are hard work, but I love writing. I love talking to people. So, when someone invites me to be on a show, if David said he was doing a puppet show for his kids and he wanted me as a guest.

Philip Stoten:
I’d be, “Yeah, I’ll do that.” I’m happy. So, yeah. I don’t know. Yeah, what would I tell myself in terms of the way you work in the industry? I don’t know, because I look at people that I’ve worked with for years and years that have made millions and some of them that haven’t done so well. And it’s not as if the ones that have made millions are the happiest ones. They tend to be the ones that get to spend less time with their family, get to go home less often. At the moment, people should enjoy the fact that they get to work at home. I’ve had conversations with you, Bill, where you’ve been in your garage and the kids are running around and it just… That looks like a lot more fun than being at the office every day.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
Or in an airplane flying around. Yes.

Philip Stoten:
Yeah, absolutely. So, yeah, I don’t know. Yeah, just have fun and enjoy it. Every time you have a career switch, think about that. Think about, let’s not jump out of this frying pan into this fire and do the same again. And just do it with a different branded shirt on, but let’s think about what we want to do with our life and our time and try and do something different and something that’s valuable.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
Yeah, and I think-

Philip Stoten:
What about you, Bill? What did you tell your… You’ve asked everybody this question, you must have an idea of what you tell 22 year old, Bill, and that’s only like five years ago. I know.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
Like 2 years ago.

Philip Stoten:
But what would you tell a 22 year old Bill?

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
No, actually, David is a millinnial so I missed by a couple of years. It’s a good question. I think I left home fairly early moved to the US from Brazil and my parents stay there. I visited them again a couple months ago when it was January and spending time with family, I think would be what I recommend the most. And we usually say that do what you love, right? And you don’t, and that will lead to success. And I have a tendency of I think that you got to do what you’re good at and eventually you’re going to love it because you’re going to be good at it, right? And if you do that, you got to fall in love because for example, they’re successful tax accountants, right? No one is in love with that. Probably if you’re good enough and you make a lot of money, you’re going to fall in love with it. So, in debts, I was fortunate that very early in my life, I fell in love with electronics and tinkering and was able turn a hobby into a career, right?

Philip Stoten:
Yeah, no. I’m a 100% with you there, Bill. Do what you love. And actually if you can do that and you can make a living, that’s a reward in itself. The other thing that I just thought of, and you and I both had the opportunity to do it a lot throughout our lives, but not now is travel. I’ve always said to my kids and my kids, one’s in London, one’s in Barcelona in Spain, “Go just travel as much as you can.” And it’s tough that you can’t travel at the moment. And I wonder if that kind of sense of adventure that you get from picking up and moving to another country to work is something that’s going to be difficult in the future, because that was a huge part of your life and your career, Bill, to move from somewhere where you perhaps didn’t have an opportunity to somewhere where you had much more opportunity.

Philip Stoten:
And the fact that that might get more difficult is a real negative of this maybe shift in a view of globalization. It’s just, I count myself really lucky that I’ve seen so much of the world, because if we get to a position where we have other viruses or other issues that make that difficult, it’s going to be much harder for other generations to do that. People can’t go backpacking for a year at the moment and visit 20 different countries. And that’s a very life expanding experience.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
It is. I mean, not seeing teachers to be humble with sleeping on a train station, difficult when you are 14 and 15.

Philip Stoten:
Yeah. And I think it makes you appreciative of other people’s lives, other people’s cultures. And you see the value in that and you see the value in, like you said, what makes people happy? What they love, even if whether they’re a tax accountant or they’re I don’t know High Wire Acrobat or whatever. They’re a different things, different strokes for different folks

David Kruidhof:
Or puppet shows star.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
Or puppet shows, yeah.

Philip Stoten:
Or puppet shows like David’s new business. David, I was curious about the doors behind you. What’s behind the doors?

David Kruidhof:
That’s the closet.

Philip Stoten:
It’s a closet. I am fascinated by Zoom culture.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
It’s actually green screenright now. But it’s-

Philip Stoten:
What they do as their background. Bill’s like the consummate corporate professional, with his branded shirt and the pictures behind. I’m pretty scruffy. It’s, what is it? 9:47 in the morning here. So, I got up early, did some work, had breakfast. So, below this, I’m in my pajamas.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
At least you are keeping it off screen. I appreciate it. Yeah.

Philip Stoten:
And then David’s, almost inside the closet, but also wearing the branded stuff, I think it’s fascinating to see how that’s changed over the last year. And every male on the planet now has a beard because nobody can be bothered to shave anymore.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
Exactly, they don’t care.

David Kruidhof:
I used to shave in the car going to work.

Philip Stoten:
No, you didn’t.

David Kruidhof:
Every time I’d drive to work I’d shave them.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
No you didn’t.

Philip Stoten:
Yeah. Do you know I always wanted to do interviews in the car? I watched that James Corden Carpool Karaoke. And I think about three years before that started where we were doing Apex in Las Vegas. I said to the guys, the crew, one of which is my son, Jack, but also caller. I said, “Guys, what I want to do is I want to get a Cadillac Eldorado convertible, set it up with the cameras and we’ll just drive people down the strip to the show and I’ll interview them in the back of the car.” How much fun would that be?

David Kruidhof:
That would have been awesome.

Philip Stoten:
And they said, “No, it’s too difficult.” Don’t you just hate that?

David Kruidhof:
No it couldn’t be difficult.

Philip Stoten:
Can’t be that hard, can it?

David Kruidhof:
It’s easy now.

Philip Stoten:
It’s all these little, I don’t know, helmet cameras and all this stuff.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
Exactly. All right. Well, we are over time.

Philip Stoten:
Of course.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
And I attribute that to Phil asking a question when I told you not to.

Philip Stoten:
I apologize.

David Kruidhof:
Well, we’ll see you again on my kid’s puppet show real soon.

Philip Stoten:
Yeah. I’m looking forward to that. Got to get working on all this stuff for when we’re going to do it.

David Kruidhof:
It’s synchronized with your hand and your voice. Well Phil, very good to have you on and Bill, always a pleasure.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
All right, guys. Thank you.

David Kruidhof:
Thank you for joining us and we’ll see you all very soon.

Philip Stoten:
Thanks a lot.

Dr. Bill Cardoso:
Have a good day, Phil.

David Kruidhof:
Thanks guys.

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Fireside Chat with the Xperts: The Hare, the Hound and Phil Zarrow

Fireside Chat with the Xperts: Or is it “S”perts?

In this week's Fireside Chat, we take the "X" out of Xpert.  With their guest, Ross Williams of HES Solar,  David Kruidhof and Dr. Bill...

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Fireside Chat with the Xperts: Or is it “S”perts?
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